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{"id":1801692739,"title":"Iron Nitrate Gun Stock Stain","handle":"iron-nitrate-gun-stock-stain","description":"\u003cp\u003eIron nitrate is a favored stain for maple gunstocks.  It imparts a traditional, durable, and beautifully rich color.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDirections:  Apply to wood.  Allow to dry. \u003cspan\u003e I usually wait for at least a half hour before applying the heat.  Overnight is fine.  Heat until color changes to reddish brown. While heating, concentrate on one particular spot with only a bit of movement of the heat gun.  When it gets hot enough, it will turn to an orange brown color. Then just start moving the heat gun slowly along to heat more of the stock.  The only thing to really watch for is to not overheat corners.  They will char and turn brown or black.  Start in more open areas to get the feel.  The only thing to stress is that you must heat it pretty hot to get the transformation.  The color change will be pretty dramatic, so don't stop heating until you see this occur.Reapply if needed.  Apply finish of choice.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eFAQ for Iron Nitrate:\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003cem\u003eDo you neutralize?\u003c\/em\u003e     \u003c\/span\u003eI don't neutralize my iron nitrate (aqafortis).  I do, however, keep it out of inlets.  It can cause some slight rusting and you never see it in inlets of original work.  There's nothing wrong with neutralizing with baking soda either, though.  Sometimes it's good to rub out the stain a bit.  My advice would be to just experiment.  If you have some scraps that will help.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eWhat if the color is a little green? \u003c\/em\u003eYou are probably not heating the stock enough.  You should see it change to a brown orange color when it's properly heated.  It's a bit scary, but without enough heat you won't get the proper color.  The only thing you have to be careful about is not overheating corners of the stock.  It heated to much you can scorch them.   Practice on a piece of scrap if you have some. \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2016-06-13T12:05:00-04:00","created_at":"2015-07-24T12:35:21-04:00","vendor":"Kibler's Longrifles","type":"Stain","tags":[],"price":2500,"price_min":2500,"price_max":2500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":5201266947,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"195035535662","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Iron Nitrate Gun Stock Stain","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":2500,"weight":166,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":-356,"inventory_management":null,"inventory_policy":"continue","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_Bottle_1_of_1.jpg?v=1437870938","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_plain_1_of_1_-2.jpg?v=1437870938","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_plain_1_of_1.jpg?v=1437870938"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_Bottle_1_of_1.jpg?v=1437870938","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":9595289718,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1774,"width":1774,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_Bottle_1_of_1.jpg?v=1568686539"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1774,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_Bottle_1_of_1.jpg?v=1568686539","width":1774},{"alt":null,"id":9595322486,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1773,"width":1773,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_plain_1_of_1_-2.jpg?v=1568686539"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1773,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_plain_1_of_1_-2.jpg?v=1568686539","width":1773},{"alt":null,"id":9595355254,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1773,"width":1773,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_plain_1_of_1.jpg?v=1568686539"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1773,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0605\/5301\/products\/Iron_Nitrate_plain_1_of_1.jpg?v=1568686539","width":1773}],"content":"\u003cp\u003eIron nitrate is a favored stain for maple gunstocks.  It imparts a traditional, durable, and beautifully rich color.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDirections:  Apply to wood.  Allow to dry. \u003cspan\u003e I usually wait for at least a half hour before applying the heat.  Overnight is fine.  Heat until color changes to reddish brown. While heating, concentrate on one particular spot with only a bit of movement of the heat gun.  When it gets hot enough, it will turn to an orange brown color. Then just start moving the heat gun slowly along to heat more of the stock.  The only thing to really watch for is to not overheat corners.  They will char and turn brown or black.  Start in more open areas to get the feel.  The only thing to stress is that you must heat it pretty hot to get the transformation.  The color change will be pretty dramatic, so don't stop heating until you see this occur.Reapply if needed.  Apply finish of choice.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eFAQ for Iron Nitrate:\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003cem\u003eDo you neutralize?\u003c\/em\u003e     \u003c\/span\u003eI don't neutralize my iron nitrate (aqafortis).  I do, however, keep it out of inlets.  It can cause some slight rusting and you never see it in inlets of original work.  There's nothing wrong with neutralizing with baking soda either, though.  Sometimes it's good to rub out the stain a bit.  My advice would be to just experiment.  If you have some scraps that will help.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eWhat if the color is a little green? \u003c\/em\u003eYou are probably not heating the stock enough.  You should see it change to a brown orange color when it's properly heated.  It's a bit scary, but without enough heat you won't get the proper color.  The only thing you have to be careful about is not overheating corners of the stock.  It heated to much you can scorch them.   Practice on a piece of scrap if you have some. \u003c\/p\u003e"}

Iron Nitrate Gun Stock Stain

Product Description

Iron nitrate is a favored stain for maple gunstocks.  It imparts a traditional, durable, and beautifully rich color.

Directions:  Apply to wood.  Allow to dry.  I usually wait for at least a half hour before applying the heat.  Overnight is fine.  Heat until color changes to reddish brown. While heating, concentrate on one particular spot with only a bit of movement of the heat gun.  When it gets hot enough, it will turn to an orange brown color. Then just start moving the heat gun slowly along to heat more of the stock.  The only thing to really watch for is to not overheat corners.  They will char and turn brown or black.  Start in more open areas to get the feel.  The only thing to stress is that you must heat it pretty hot to get the transformation.  The color change will be pretty dramatic, so don't stop heating until you see this occur.Reapply if needed.  Apply finish of choice.

FAQ for Iron Nitrate:

Do you neutralize?     I don't neutralize my iron nitrate (aqafortis).  I do, however, keep it out of inlets.  It can cause some slight rusting and you never see it in inlets of original work.  There's nothing wrong with neutralizing with baking soda either, though.  Sometimes it's good to rub out the stain a bit.  My advice would be to just experiment.  If you have some scraps that will help.

What if the color is a little green? You are probably not heating the stock enough.  You should see it change to a brown orange color when it's properly heated.  It's a bit scary, but without enough heat you won't get the proper color.  The only thing you have to be careful about is not overheating corners of the stock.  It heated to much you can scorch them.   Practice on a piece of scrap if you have some. 

$25.00
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QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

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  • Hello, I purchased a bottle of your iron nitrate dye and tried it on a test piece of quilted maple. It turned out way too dark and blotchy. Is there any way to dilute the solution to produce a lighter result?

    It probably came out pretty dark because quilted maple if often big leaf
    maple or some other softer maple that absorbs a lot and therefore will get
    dark and splotchy.  You can definitely dilute it with water and see if you
    like the result better.  Try a 50% dilution and see what you think about
    that.

  • First, should the stock be wetted, moistened or dampened? Second, if only dampened and heated, can I dampen and heat again to get darker color? Third, if the color is uneven can I dampen the lighter spots and heat to blend in? Fourth, does the stain stop working at a certain point and not get darker if heat is continued? Fifth, can I dilute the stain with alcohol if I want to get a slight degree of change?

    1. I am not sure of the difference between these three--but I would wipe it on until the solution wets the stock
    2. Yes you can do this, but you won't get too much darker the second time
    3. Yes, Jim does this regularly
    4. Yes, once it is thoroughly heated and the blushing occurs completely, the chemical reaction has occurred and it won't get any darker with continued heating.  
    5.  Yes, you can dilute.  I would recommend water dilution     

  • I have never used acid based stains before and was wondering what I need to use to neutralize the stain after applying it? Or does it need to be neutralized at all. I don’t want to end up with a rusty mess afterwards. I’ve read horror stories about using acid stains. Should all of the metalwork need to be removed prior to using this?


    You should keep it out of all the inlets (yes, you need to remove all the metal before staining/finishing).  Jim says there is no need to neutralize since it is not in the inlets.

  • Hello, I was unable to find info about what do you use to finish a stock after the iron nitrate

    There are many options for finishing.  We sell Permalyn sealer which is a nice sturdy finish that should be applied in thin coats.   Also good are Jim Chambers Oil Finish, Tried and True Varnish Oil.

  • Will your iron nitrate stain work on walnut? What results can I honestly expect?

    Yes, it can be used on walnut but the results are not necessarily consistent. It will likely darken the stock and add some warm tones.

  • Hi Katherine this is james wheeler Do you guys recommend using the tanic acid with the iron nitrate on the fancy maple stock ? If so I’m going to order some of it to for my kit when it comes.

    Many customers have used the tannic acid/iron nitrate combo on fancy maple with great results. It will cool down the warmth a bit and if warmth is what you are going for, you will need to add it back with some aniline dyes.      

  • Hello, I was unable to find info about what do you use to finish a stock after the iron nitrate

    There are many options for finishing.  We sell Permalyn sealer which is a nice sturdy finish that should be applied in thin coats.   Also good are Jim Chambers Oil Finish, Tried and True Varnish Oil.

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